Four Seasons at the Port

Last week – on Twelfth Night, a day we Shakespeare lovers always observe – we took one of our favorite urban walks at the Port of Los Angeles. After a bout of puffer coat and gloves weather, it was good to be out on a mild winter evening with beautiful light. Also, refreshing to leave behind for a while the disturbing U.S. political events of the day.  

I’d just finished reading Anthony Doerr’s fine memoir, Four Seasons in Rome, which catalyzed the realization that here we were in our fourth season of Covid-19 LA. Living in another fascinating city, but unlike Doerr in Rome, restricted by the pandemic from freely exploring its attractions, or even escaping to the natural world of our coastal environment with its fabulous beaches, trails and walks by the ocean.

As the months went by and Covid cases burgeoned, our radius shrank: Parks, trails and beaches closed, and when they reopened, crowds returned, many people failing to wear masks or observe social distancing. We stopped taking many of our usual walks and hikes, and the port became our primary getaway –– a reliable, sparsely frequented safe haven of solitude and space.

Even before Covid, we regularly walked there, forging various interesting routes, enjoying the colorful industrial landscape and constant hum of maritime activity. Fortunately, we like finding new things in familiar places, and our regular rambles at the port during the pandemic have not disappointed.

There’s so much to explore and photograph in our vast harbor landscape. Here is a mini tour of the routes we’ve taken through the changing seasons of the pandemic.

We’ll start with this peaceful, tree-lined city park with its spacious promenade, the scene of our Twelfth Night walk last week. It’s one of those quiet retreats you find in every city; once inside its leafy seclusion, you scarcely notice the busy thoroughfare that runs right next to it.

We’ve walked here so many times in the past year that we’re among the regulars who recognize each other despite the masks and exchange a friendly greeting, a few words, a wave, in Covid camaraderie.

Keep going past the shady benches, stone chess tables and a now dormant fountain, where children jump and squeal in the spray during a normal summer. On your left, you’ll come to the City of LA fireboat station, where you can sometimes catch sight of that big sophisticated boat at rest. You might even hear a loudspeaker staff alert that fresh cookies are available in the station kitchen.

Our final stop on this route is the small pier just past the fireboat station, dwarfed by a massive container ship in the photo below. Notice the people, similarly dwarfed, getting a very close-up look at the ship.

The pier offers great views of sea and sky, the port’s extensive shipping operations and the fascinating movement of maritime traffic.

Moored nearby are the tugboats that maneuver the giant cargo ships entering and leaving the port. Behind the tugs (below) is the 1,500-foot-long Vincent Thomas suspension bridge that crosses Los Angeles Harbor.

From this small pier with big views, you can see historic Warehouse No. 1, completed in 1917. Its distinctive tower, with a welcome greeting in many languages, is visible from miles away. The landmark building and its environs are the next route on our tour.

As the port’s only bonded warehouse, Warehouse No. 1 played a crucial role in LA’s entry into international trade. It’s a striking old structure with its many balconies, lion gargoyles and layers of grunge.

Here is a close-up of one of the lion gargoyles on the side of the warehouse in the photo above.

I like industrial landscapes and find art in them, so I always enjoy walking in this area and photographing interesting buildings and details. On one of our 2020 rambles, this sculptural outdoor warehouse equipment and its textural setting, like the gargoyles, appealed to me.

Walking this familiar route through three seasons of the coronavirus pandemic has not been without its elements of surprise. In spring, we encountered these companion flags, torn and battered, flying in the wind. They struck a chord as an apt symbol for a country in the midst of a deadly worldwide pandemic. With the rise of Covid cases and deaths, and our socio-political turmoil, the symbolism still feels apt.

On another spring walk, I found this bright explosion of California poppies at the curb of a drab industrial building. A cheering burst of color on an overcast day.

One summer afternoon, a whimsical “art installation” appeared on our route.

Who knows what we’ll find in this fourth season?

Copyright M. Vincent 2021

Port of Los Angeles tugboats at golden hour photo and Warehouse No. 1 photo copyright Brad Nixon 2021. Used with kind permission.

All other photographs copyright M. Vincent 2019-2021.

What’s Cooking at the Cafe?

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Cooking in the time of the coronavirus is about the spirit as much as the body. In the best of times, making and enjoying good food is one of the joys and comforts of life. In the worst of times, the pleasure, diversion, and comfort it brings are more important than ever.

It’s not surprising then, that people everywhere are spending more time in the kitchen since Covid-19 has transformed our world and “stay at home, save lives” measures have gone into effect.

In this post, I’ll share some of the food we’ve been making at My Eclectic Café.

A Baking Renaissance?

Let’s start with that loaf of whole wheat bread above, which I baked earlier this week.

It appears that Covid-19 may have given rise to a home-bread-baking renaissance. Flour has disappeared from market shelves in many places, per reports we’ve heard, and we’ve seen scant supplies in our own area. When we decided to bake bread a week ago, all of our local stores were out of yeast.

Fortunately, the cafe always has a stash of flour, and kind friends in Washington state mailed us yeast from their own pantry and local market to keep bread in our oven as the pandemic continues.

I made the bread above from a simple King Arthur Flour (KAF) recipe, easy to follow for even novice bakers. You can find it on the KAF website here.

While I’ve baked bread before, I was trying this recipe for the first time and would use it again. I had the KAF white whole wheat flour specified, chose the molasses option for a darker loaf, and left out the dried milk.

The bread was moist and flavorful, with a chewy, well-browned crust, made great toast, and stayed fresh for days. It was great with the vegetable soup below.

I’ve baked with several types of KAF flour for years and recommend it. Their website is a valuable source of tips, recipes, and informative articles and reviews for beginning to experienced bakers.

Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Central

Healthy eating is always a priority at My Eclectic Café, with a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables at the center of our cooking. Since the Covid-19 crisis, we’ve been amplifying that focus. It’s a good time to be vegetarian: When other foods have been swept off the shelves, we’ve found the produce section of our stores well-stocked.

Before our Southern California weather hit 90 degrees this week, we enjoyed this spicy, colorful mixed vegetable soup: cauliflower, carrots, zucchini, Napa cabbage and corn with brown rice and Penzey’s southwest seasoning (a mix of spices and herbs with the heat of ancho, cayenne and chipotle peppers).

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Such fresh, homemade soups have been a lunchtime staple — comfort food with the benefit of numerous vitamins and nutrients for staying well and keeping the immune system strong.

Salads, made with diverse vegetables or fruits, nuts, and selected proteins, have also been on our daily menu.

If you’re shopping much less often, as we are, to limit potential exposure to the virus, heads of radicchio and Napa (Chinese) cabbage are both versatile, long-lasting salad ingredients. They also go well together in a salad. Napa cabbage leaves are much more tender than those of red or green cabbage. They also have a mild, slightly sweet flavor that contrasts nicely with the bitey radicchio.

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Open the cafe refrigerator, and you’ll find it brimming with citrus fruit. We’ve eaten tons of it in the past few months, as I fought to get over a mean bout of bronchitis and the Covid-19 pandemic burgeoned.

Grapefruit, tangerines, oranges, lemons. Rich in Vitamin C and other nutrients, they’re a constant ingredient in our fruit bowls, salads and other dishes, as well as a favorite refreshing snack. I use the juice and zest to add “oomph” to my cooking and baking, especially lemon juice, which brightens any dish. The cafe is blessed to have a prolific and treasured Meyer lemon tree in the backyard.

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What’s for Dessert?

While we love dessert at the cafe, we usually keep it light and simple: fresh fruit and a piece of very dark chocolate, or that chocolate with a cup of green tea or breakfast coffee. (Yes, it’s perfectly acceptable to have dessert at breakfast — especially now, when we all need some uplifting treats to sweeten the day.)

Endangered Species’ wonderfully smooth bittersweet chocolate (low sugar, 88% percent cocoa) is a favorite, always on our menu. In addition to making excellent chocolate, the company supports conservation efforts for endangered species and habitats.

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I’ve been baking mostly breakfast muffins lately and dreaming of making other pastry, but I did try a new cookie recipe that’s definitely a keeper: cardamom-walnut crescents from The New York Times.  My co-confiné agrees.

I love nut cookies, and these are delicious: light and not too sweet, with a great texture. The recipe is adaptable and doesn’t take long to make. My adaptations: raw pecans in the absence of walnuts, olive oil in place of some of the butter, cinnamon instead of cardamom, and a light dusting of powdered sugar when completely cooled. I look forward to trying them with walnuts and cardamom too.

More baking to come at the cafe. I’m craving those anise-almond biscotti above, remembering happy pan meino and coffee breakfasts in Milan, pondering a fruit galette …

Your  Turn

It’s a good time to try new recipes, enjoy comforting old favorites, and set a cheering table. What have you been making?

Copyright M. Vincent 2020. All photos copyright M. Vincent 2020.

Licensable, high-resolution versions of some photographs in this post, and select images from other My Eclectic Café posts are available on Shutterstock.com. Click here to view my Vince360 Shutterstock photo portfolio.

U.S. Naval Hospital Ship Mercy Arrives at the Port of LA

USN Ship Mercy Banner-BN

U.S. Naval Hospital Ship Mercy arrived at the Port of Los Angeles this past weekend, bringing welcome aid to our city in its fight against the coronavirus. It was a moving experience to be there on site as the massive ship appeared and to watch it sailing through the channel to its berth (where it appears above).

With COVID-19 cases rapidly rising in California, and substantial impact projected for LA, our governor requested Mercy’s immediate deployment to help ensure that we have the medical facilities and assets needed here.

Mercy’s purpose is to alleviate the burden on LA-area hospitals as COVID-19 cases accelerate. It will handle other critical care cases, allowing our local hospitals to focus their resources on COVID-19 patients.

Chasing Mercy

My partner tracked Mercy’s schedule, and we planned to get to the port early to see the ship arrive. It was a perfect early spring day — mild, clear and sunny — and getting outdoors for a cheering event was a refreshing break from the fraught, quarantined life. The world seemed almost normal, except for the virtually empty Friday morning streets.

That changed when we arrived at our chosen viewing point. Nowhere to park and a crowd that made social distancing impossible. Not surprising. Fortunately we know the area well, and a short drive away, it was mostly quiet. It was easy to preserve my space, though I did have to shoot photos through a chain-link fence.

Here is a photo of U.S. Coast Guard ship “Halibut,” which led Mercy through the channel.

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Halibut is a Marine Protector Class patrol boat based in Marina del Rey, California. One of its functions is port security. Because it’s based so close to LA, the Halibut is known in the Coast Guard as “the Hollywood cutter” and is often used to represent the Coast Guard in broadcasts, television shows and movies.

Shortly after the Halibut passed by, Mercy sailed into view — a monumental presence 854 feet long and 106 feet wide.

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My partner got the best shot of the ship as it made its way to its berth in an area normally occupied by giant cruise ships.  You can get a sense of its magnitude from his photo below.

USN Ship Mercy sails in II-BN

Usually, we see one or two tugboats pushing or pulling the cruise ships into place. Four tugboats were present to assist the smaller, but less maneuverable Mercy.

As Mercy continued its journey, we headed home — or so we thought — following its path up the channel. Approaching the cruise-ship terminal, traffic was markedly different from what we’d experienced earlier that morning.

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We assumed the “No entrance” sign flashing ahead meant no public ingress to Mercy’s docking area, but fortuitously, the turnoff to the cruise ship terminal was open, and we swung in, found immediate parking, and joined the band of people heading across the street to welcome Mercy.

Celebrating a Historic Moment

Mercy’s berth was just a short walk away. As we approached the ship, we found a lively scene with a variety of people gathered, from members of the community like us, some with school-age children in tow, to professional newspeople and photographers.

Law enforcement and military circulated among the gathering. Everyone was courteous and tried to observe a reasonable amount of social distance.

A row of photographers hugged the fence in front of Mercy, tripods set up, intently focused. Others snapped away on their cell phones, waved at the Mercy team members on deck or just stood back to observe the scene and enjoy the bright, fresh morning.

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In the midst of the action, a newswoman and her cameraman prepared for filming.

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A bicyclist pedaling back and forth waving a large American flag exemplified the mood of quiet celebration I felt as we all converged to witness this moment in history.

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At this distressing time, Mercy’s arrival brings solace, cheer, and the hope that comes from additional readiness in the coronavirus fight. That is a mercy indeed.

Thank you to all who made Mercy’s rapid deployment to Los Angeles happen, from Governor Newsom to the U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command and everyone who worked to prepare the ship for this mission. Best wishes to the Mercy medical team and staff as they assume their life-saving duties.

Mercy’s Capabilities

Stationed in San Diego when not on active duty, Mercy has 1,000 hospital beds, 12 operating rooms and nearly 1,300 medical staff and crew on board.

You can see inside the USNS Mercy, view its additional facilities and learn some of its history here.

Local Stories Welcomed

What state or local COVID-19 preparedness/relief actions are happening in your community? Please share your news from around the world as we navigate this difficult time together.

Copyright M. Vincent 2020.

Mercy docking at its berth at the Port of LA and Mercy sailing into the port, copyright Brad Nixon 2020, used with kind permission. Etymology lovers, see his related post here. 

All other photos copyright M. Vincent 2020.